Schlagworte: Care Robots

Robots and AI Systems in Healthcare

Robots in the health sector are important, valuable innovations and supplements. As therapy and nursing robots, they take care of us and come close to us. In addition, other service robots are widespread in nursing and retirement homes and hospitals. With the help of their sensors, all of them are able to recognize us, to examine and classify us, and to evaluate our behavior and appearance. Some of these robots will pass on our personal data to humans and machines. They invade our privacy and challenge the informational autonomy. This is a problem for the institutions and the people that needs to be solved. The article “The Spy who Loved and Nursed Me: Robots and AI Systems in Healthcare from the Perspective of Information Ethics” by Oliver Bendel presents robot types in the health sector, along with their technical possibilities, including their sensors and their artificial intelligence capabilities. Against this background, moral problems are discussed, especially from the perspective of information ethics and with respect to privacy and informational autonomy. One of the results shows that such robots can improve the personal autonomy, but the informational autonomy is endangered in an area where privacy has a special importance. At the end, solutions are proposed from various disciplines and perspectives. The article was published in Telepolis on December 17, 2018 and can be accessed via www.heise.de/tp/features/The-Spy-who-Loved-and-Nursed-Me-4251919.html.

Fig.: When monitoring becomes surveillance

Nursing Robots from the Perspective of Ethics

The swissnexDay’16 will take place at the University of Basel (December 15, 2016). The second break-out session “Care-Robots – an elderly’s best friend?” starts shortly after 4 pm. An extract from the description: “Ageing societies and a lack of qualified caregivers are challenging our current system and innovative solutions are strongly needed. Japan, with 20% of its population being over 65 years, is leading the development of robotic solutions. In this session, a diverse panel will discuss the current landscape in Japan and draw comparison to the situation in Switzerland. We will also discuss ethical applications and different perception of the relationship between human + robots.” (Website swissnex) Kyoko Suzuki (Deputy Head, S&T Tokyo), Christiana Tsiourti (University of Geneva) and Christine Fahlberg (School of Business FHNW, master student of Prof. Dr. Oliver Bendel) will present their current research and discuss about robots in healthcare. Christine Fahlberg is focussing on the use of nursing robots from the perspective of ethics. Keynote speakers of the swissnexDay’16 are Prof. Dr. Andrea Schenker-Wicki (President, University of Basel), Dr. med. Guy Morin (President of the Executive Council of the Canton of Basel-Stadt) and State Secretary Mauro Dell’Ambrogio (State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation). Further information via www.swissnex.org/news/swissnexdays/.

Fig.: Will humans be replaced in healthcare?

Ladenburger Diskurs zu Pflegerobotern

Prof. Dr. Oliver Bendel von der Hochschule für Wirtschaft FHNW lädt in diesen Tagen renommierte Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler zum Ladenburger Diskurs 2017 über Pflegeroboter ein. Am 12. und 13. September arbeitet man in der Villa der Daimler und Benz Stiftung in Ladenburg zusammen, trägt vor und diskutiert. Pflegeroboter unterstützen oder ersetzen – so die Idee – menschliche Pflegekräfte bzw. Betreuerinnen und Betreuer. Sie bringen und reichen Kranken und Alten die benötigten Medikamente und Nahrungsmittel, helfen ihnen beim Hinlegen und Aufrichten oder alarmieren den Notdienst. Die Daimler und Benz Stiftung engagiert sich immer wieder in Bezug auf Robotik und Künstliche Intelligenz (KI) und mit Blick auf moralische und soziale Themen, wie 2015 mit einer Tagung zur Roboterethik. Der Workshop ermöglicht technische, wirtschaftliche, medizinische und ethische Reflexionen über Pflegeroboter. Die Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer aus der Wissenschaft – die Ethiker werden ausschließlich Vertreter der Moralphilosophie, nicht der Moraltheologie sein – sollen kontrovers und konstruktiv diskutieren und zu neuen Erkenntnissen gelangen. Die Anwesenheit von Entwicklern und Anwendern und mindestens eines Prototyps wird angestrebt. Nach der Veranstaltung erscheint eine gemeinsame Publikation in einem Fachverlag als Sammlung der verschriftlichten Vorträge. Über den Ladenburger Diskurs 2017 wird auf informationsethik.net und maschinenethik.net berichtet.

Abb.: Pflegeroboter und Oberärztin im Gespräch